Absinthe and famous personalities

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Absinthe and famous personalities is this weeks’ topic. Because there are many famous personalities that came in contact with Absinthe, this will be the first part of two.

Disclaimer: If you have not yet read the previous two posts, please make sure to read them before you read this one. The following may reflect old thinking and does not reflect the current finding of science or any knowledge.    …Continue reading “Absinthe and famous personalities”

Absinthism and the comparison of Absinthe to Cannabis

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This week you are going to learn about Absinthism and we will deal with the question: Are Absinthe and Cannabis comparable? Enjoy!

Absinthism

Absinthe was the scapegoat at the beginning of the 20th century. It was said, that drinking Absinthe will make you crazy. Even an illness was ascribed, “Absinthism”. Now, as you already know from last weeks article about Absinthe Prohibition, Absinthe is not dangerous. So why does the term Absinthism exist?

The term first came up in the 1860’s when the debate about health issues concerning Absinthe consumption arose. It was claimed that chronic use of Absinthe causes addiction, hyperexcitability, epileptic fits and hallucinations. This was first described in a series of papers by Dr. Valentin Magnan.    …Continue reading “Absinthism and the comparison of Absinthe to Cannabis”

Some facts about Absinthe Prohibition

As probably most of you know Absinthe, the Green Fairy, had been banned most of the 20th century. In the following we have put together some information about Absinthe prohibition. There are so many rumors out there about Absinthe and its prohibition, therefore it is a good advice to check out these facts:

Countries that officially prohibited Absinthe:

Even though there had been a few places that had banned Absinthe already, one can say that the whole prohibition movement started around 1905 in Switzerland. Absinthe was increasingly blamed to be poisonous and got the scapegoat for all societal problems relating to alcohol consumption. The decision to officially ban the Green Fairy was made in 1908 and in 1910 the ban was implemented in the Swiss constitution. In the Netherlands (1909), United States (1912) and France (1914) Absinthe got as well prohibited. Germany followed in 1923 with Absinthe prohibition.    …Continue reading “Some facts about Absinthe Prohibition”

Absinthe Study Session 5 – Pernod Fils Absinthe

Probably the most famous Absinthe company in history was Pernod Fils. The firm was established in 1805 in Pontarlier (France) by Henri-Louis Pernod. In the beginning, there were just two stills in the factory, producing not more than 16 litres of Absinthe per day.  But this should change dramatically….    …Continue reading “Absinthe Study Session 5 — Pernod Fils Absinthe”

Absinthe Study Session 4 – Absinthe and its legalization

The first country, which banned Absinthe was Switzerland  in the year 1910.  The US followed in 1912 (for “protective” measures), France decided to give death to the Green Fairy  in 1915 and Germany followed in 1923. The only countries, which never banned Absinthe were Spain and the UK.    …Continue reading “Absinthe Study Session 4 – Absinthe and its legalization”

Absinthe Study Session 3 – Absinthe´s Green Color

The Green Fairy is green. But how does the green color come into the Absinthe? The color of Absinthe results out of the maceration of various herbs, which are added to the colorless spirit after distillation. This means after distillation Absinthe is not green, it is a clear but flavorful distillate. When no herbs are added for maceration after this primary distillation you will have a  “Blanche” or “Bleue” Absinthe.

A Verte – a green Absinthe – goes through a second process. Additional herbs are infused and the chlorophyll gives the Fairy it´s alluring green color. Besides the coloration, the herbs enhance the flavor profile.

   …Continue reading “Absinthe Study Session 3 — Absinthe´s Green Color”

ALANDIA Study Session 2 – The big burning at the Pernod Factory

Pernod had on of its biggest distilleries in Pontarlier, France, next to the river Doubs. Daily production was up to 125,000 liters of Absinthe per day in 1896. A notable disaster occured on a Sunday, August 11, 1901. Mr. Borel, the plant manager was away the day a ferocious thunderstorm broke over the town. Lightning hit the central dome of the plant and ran through the metal framework. The electrical charge reached the tanks full of alcohol and set the whole plant into fire! Inside the factory bottles melted or exploded with the heat.

ALANDIA Study Session 1 – Absinthe and Sugar

 

Historically Absinthe was drank with sugar. Pernod and other traditional Absinthe brands promoted the sugar ritual in their advertisings. The intent of using sugar was not to mask the bitterness of Absinthe, moreover the use of sugar reflects the preference for sweetness during the 19th century.

Sugar was still something special and luxurious. Absinthe was as well drank with other sweeteners such as anisette or Orgeat, a French almond syrup. The sugar cube was invented by Mr. Christian Rad in 1841. Before that, sugar was sold in blocks. As Mrs. Rads cut her hand badly by trying to slice a block, her husband had the idea to sell sugar „precutted“; In Dacice in the Czech Republic, the hometown of Mr. Rad, the sugar cube monumental is a touristic attraction.

   …Continue reading “ALANDIA Study Session 1 — Absinthe and Sugar”